Amazon AWS RDS - How To Use RDS today

Today AWS Amazon RDS (Relational Database Servers in the AWS Cloud) is a new Beta and needs to be used as a “peek that the future” for the IT staff and CTO. Developers need to wrap there minds around Relational Database as a service. The time has come for this to be a real SaaS.

The “Big Table” was easy to “pu pu” and say “It does not fit the model”. RDS is the “real thing” a transactional Relational Database with all the bells and …

IMHO, we need to start looking at this new model by placing non-mission critical Backup Systems for Fail Over in RDS. The cost of transfers into RDS is very small. The cost for running 1 hr. a day is cents. When you need to fail over, you can launch a HUGE db server and get ton of performance to make up for the remote location if you are “outside” EC2. If you are “inside” ec2 this is a no-brainier.

1) First Step, Create an RDS server with RS use a small instance.
2) Each day copy over the “backup” to a live RDS instance.
3) Turn it off. The RDS makes a Final-SNAP backup on Deletion (read Termination)

On Fail:

1) Start the RDS on a large server as needed for production, from back SNAP.
2) You are up and running

COST:

11 cents a day!!!!! ( I assume you use a SMALL Right?)

Save:

You are up and working with a real MySQL 5.1 in under 15 min. (worst case) when your DB crumbles and dies one day.

Side effects:

Now you can use the RDS server each day to:

1) Test that your backups work, NICE….
2) Do a roll up of the “stats” that the DBA was telling you “takes the site down, stop that!!” (just use the RDS off line, NICE..)
3) Test out new database ideas at now risk to production. Or two ideas at the same time, I love that clone feature…
4) The list of off line uses for the DB backup copy go on and on…